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  #201  
Old 04-01-2021, 11:02 PM
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set track set track is offline
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it looks like it will be panic buying to-morrow

stay safe guys & gall's

from all at mr track's
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  #202  
Old 05-01-2021, 12:35 PM
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Holly Goodhead Holly Goodhead is offline
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It's not going to make much change here, farming goes on, there is still loads of work in at the garage, Bob still has lots of work he can do if he wants too.

Most round here stay on the farms, I only go out to shop at the Farm foods shop, and get what Tim and Bob need at the sametime.

We could if we had to live off the farm, we also had a good stock of most things over Christmas, It's nice to go down to the Crown at times, but that will be closed.

Still have lots of office work and accounts to do and help out on the farm and do the cooking for me and Timbo.

Big worry is keeping Bob well, and so far he's been fine and no leg or eating trouble, lets hope it stays that way.

take care, Holly
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  #203  
Old 05-01-2021, 07:41 PM
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With the country in lockdown and a new faster-spreading variant of coronavirus rampant, it's clear the UK is in a race to vaccinate.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson wants all the over-70s, the most clinically vulnerable and front-line health and care workers to be offered a jab by mid-February, to allow the restrictions to be eased.

That requires about 13 million people to be given the opportunity to be vaccinated - but so far only one million have been.

And ensuring a quick rollout to the rest is fraught with difficulties.

There is enough vaccine in the country, BBC News has learned, but getting it into people's arms could be hampered by:

1, a global shortage of glass vials to package up the vaccines
2, long waits for safety checks
3, the process of ensuring there are enough vaccinators

How could a shortage of glass disrupt supply?

Two Covid vaccines have now been approved - one produced by Pfizer-BioNTech and another made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca.

The UK government has ordered 140 million doses - enough for the whole population.

The first hurdle is manufacture of the vaccine.

This involves two crucial stages - the production of the substance and then a process called fill and finish whereby the vaccine is put into vials and packaged up for use.

And there is already a concern about the latter stage, with the availability of key ingredients and equipment including glass vials a key issue.

England's deputy chief medical officer Prof Jonathan Van-Tam says fill and finish was a "critically short resource across the globe".

That is part of the reason why the amount of the two vaccines ready to go is more limited than ministers had hoped.

UK plants have made somewhere around 15 million or so doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine - that in itself is less than ministers said would be made at this stage (early in the pandemic they said there would be 30 million by the autumn).

But only four million have been through the fill-and-finish process.

The UK has used plants in Germany and the Netherlands to do some of this for the early batches.

But the government has also invested in a plant in Wrexham to ensure there is domestic capacity.

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, meanwhile, is made outside of the UK - it comes from a plant in Belgium.

When it arrives in the UK, it has already been placed into vials.

But so far, fewer than five million doses have been delivered - less than half the number that should have been - because of problems with manufacture, including the fill-and-finish process.

What are the safety checks for vaccines?
Who will get the Covid vaccine first?

Are the final checks taking too long?

Even once a vaccine is in the vials though, there is still one more step before the NHS can start using it.

Each batch has to be checked and certified by the Medicines and Healthcare Products regulatory Agency.

And it can be several weeks before the vaccine can be given to the NHS to put in people's arms.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has called this a "rate-limiting factor".

About four million doses of the Oxford vaccine have been available for some weeks - they were put into vials last year - but as yet only just over 500,000 have been certified as safe to use.

Sources close to the NHS vaccination programme said this had been one of the key frustrations - saying it was taking up to 20 days for batches to be tested and released.

The MHRA said each batch had to be biologically tested for quality, while the manufacturer's documentation describing its production and quality-control testing process was reviewed.

Those close to the process say it does take a couple of weeks - and with more vaccine being produced, there is increased demand on the labs that do the work.

"You have to remember this is being injected into people," they said. "We cannot rush this."

Both vaccines have to go through this process.
What have hospitals, GP practices and racecourses got to do with it?

Once batches have been certified, they are ready to be distributed to the NHS vaccination centres.

Eventually, there will be a network of more than 1,000 local centres across the UK.

Currently, just over 700 are up and running.

These are being run from a wide variety of venues, from hospitals and large GP centres to community venues, racecourses and, perhaps in the future, conference centres and sports stadiums.

About four million doses of the Oxford vaccine have been available for some weeks - they were put into vials last year - but as yet only just over 500,000 have been certified as safe to use.

Sources close to the NHS vaccination programme said this had been one of the key frustrations - saying it was taking up to 20 days for batches to be tested and released.

The MHRA said each batch had to be biologically tested for quality, while the manufacturer's documentation describing its production and quality-control testing process was reviewed.

Those close to the process say it does take a couple of weeks - and with more vaccine being produced, there is increased demand on the labs that do the work.

"You have to remember this is being injected into people," they said. "We cannot rush this."

Both vaccines have to go through this process.
What have hospitals, GP practices and racecourses got to do with it?

Once batches have been certified, they are ready to be distributed to the NHS vaccination centres.

Eventually, there will be a network of more than 1,000 local centres across the UK.

Currently, just over 700 are up and running.

These are being run from a wide variety of venues, from hospitals and large GP centres to community venues, racecourses and, perhaps in the future, conference centres and sports stadiums.
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  #204  
Old 05-01-2021, 10:04 PM
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Dongo Dongo is offline
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I had my first Covid vaccination on Saturday, just given three hours prior notice.
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  #205  
Old 05-01-2021, 10:56 PM
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miss Lisa Shufflebum miss Lisa Shufflebum is offline
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lets hope they have 4 vaccination's available for our address

stay safe guy's & gall's

Lisa Tina Carly xxx & mr track
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  #206  
Old 11-01-2021, 04:55 PM
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Holly Goodhead Holly Goodhead is offline
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Up date today.

Department of Health and Social Care - DHSC
is sharing a COVID-19 update.

The new strain of #COVID19 is spreading fast, with cases rising across the country.
We all need to stay at home.



Police are also out, there were seven police cars seen out in Madley, do make sure you know where you are going and can.
Holly
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  #207  
Old 11-01-2021, 08:58 PM
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Holly Goodhead Holly Goodhead is offline
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Bobs Daughter works in a care home, and had the Oxford astrazencea vaccine injection and as feeling fine
We had this news today.
Holly
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